Imagine this: You are in a social setting with a group of people you have just met, or recently met, and someone you barely know takes you aside and says something like this: “Psst . . . see that woman over there? She doesn’t have a uterus! ” Followed by a derogatory comment with an inappropriate label and a snicker . . .

You’d think the person who told you this was crazy, right? You’d probably be offended. You might ask the person why the fact the woman had a hysterectomy is worthy of gossip and derision. You might even make a complaint about the gossip to the host of the event.

Obviously, that type of gossip is just not acceptable in social settings. So, why is it so acceptable to many people in similar social settings to point out that so-and-so is “gay” or “a transgender person,” perhaps using derogatory terms like “faggot” or “tranny” or mislabelling them altogether — such as calling a fully transitioned woman “a transsexual” (see preceding post)?

Food for thought . . .

Jillian